Keyboard

What Are Asus ROG RX Switches?

We’ve reviewed the Asus ROG Claymore II and Strix Scope RX mechanical keyboards, and both of them have one thing in common: they feature Asus’ very own ROG RX optical switches. Surprisingly enough, these switches are actually quite good, even in comparison to aftermarket switches in the enthusiast keyboard scene.

If you’re looking to get a pre-built keyboard, consider an Asus keyboard with these ROG RX switches – they really are quite impressive. Not quite convinced? Then read on!

So what are ROG RX optical switches? Well, there are two of them: there’s the lighter ROG RX Red 55g linear switch, and the slightly heavier RX Blue 60g clicky switch. I’ve tested both of these switches, and even though I prefer the RX Red switch – I prefer smooth, linear switches – the RX Blue is still a great option for fans of clicky switches.

Now, let’s talk about the typing experience of the two switches. The ROG RX Red switch, even in stock form, offers a very smooth downstroke. While there’s a hint of scratch sound, it does not feel scratchy at all.

As for the RX Blue switch, even though it’s not quite as smooth as the RX Red, I love the fact that it has a pronounced tactile bump without being obnoxiously loud. In fact, it reminds me of the Kailh Box White switch, which is considered to be one of the better clicky switches in the custom mechanical keyboard scene.

Another characteristic of the ROG RX switches that is worth mentioning is how little wobble they have. Thanks to the unique hollow square stem design with four “corner latches” – as well as the scissor-style stabiliser – both the RX Red and RX Blue switches are incredibly stable.

Even when compared to the plethora of aftermarket switches available in the market now, the ROG RX switches are up there among the best in terms of stability. If you want a “stable” typing experience free of any noticeable wobble, these RX switches offer just that.

Another advantage of the unique hollow square stem design is better, brighter backlighting. Because the LED is placed right in the middle of the ROG RX switch, you get very bright and consistent backlighting across all keys. If you want a gaming keyboard with bright, colourful RGB lighting, look for an Asus keyboard with RX switches.

But not all is great with these ROG RX switches. While they’re great in most aspects, the unconventional stem design of these switches means that you cannot swap out the default keycaps with aftermarket keycap sets from GMK and the likes.

Aside from that, the sound profile of the ROG RX switches isn’t great either. Both the RX Blue and RX Red has a tendency to ping – though this isn’t very obvious in regular typing – and they have a rather thin topping out sound too.

Then again, pre-built keyboards don’t exactly have the best sound profile, so this isn’t exactly…well, unexpected.

But overall, when it comes to pre-built keyboards, the Asus ROG RX switches are definitely options worth considering. Given that switches impact the typing experience of a mechanical keyboard quite a bit, there’s no denying just how important they are when you’re deciding on a new keyboard.

Of course, I would still wholeheartedly recommend building a custom mechanical keyboard instead for an even better typing experience and customisation options. But this isn’t always a feasible, whether it’s due to time constraint or budget limitation.

If you’re in such a situation, a pre-built keyboard can still serve you well, especially ones from Asus with ROG RX switches.